How is Jesus still serving you today?

Forty days after the resurrection comes the ascension of Jesus. He was “declared Son of God” through his resurrection (Acts 13:33; Romans 1:4) and now he returned to God’s throne, having completed his work in atoning for our sins and giving his life to serve us (Mark 10:45).

Yet Jesus’ work for us does not end there. He  serves us still in his life in heaven, interceding for us (Hebrews 7:25), sending his Spirit to teach us the truth (John 14:26), and giving gifts to the church in the manner of a conquering king handing out treasures to his victorious people – except these gifts are not silver coins but spiritual roles in the Church (Ephesians 4:7-12).

The significance of Jesus’ ascension is not only that he reigns – now, today – over all things. This Sovereign also serves his people. Our risen Lord is still, wonderfully, our serving-without-sinking_3servant. He intercedes for us, teaches us, and equips us to serve Him.

In our book Of The Term “Serving without Sinking” (a unique gospel-shaped book about grace, not a guilt-inducing one about sacrifice) I have loved reading the three middle chapters which illustrate how Christ serves us.  His grace defines the nature of our serving Him in grateful response.

The three metaphors the author finds in the Bible for Christian life are all stunning privileges: we are not servants but friends of Jesus, not a self-justifying client but a forgiven bride of Christ, and not convenient slaves but forgiven sons of God. These chapters alone are worth the book price and worthy of reading over and over again.

Is Jesus serving you today? If you want to know more, “Serving without Sinking” is highly recommended.

 

 

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How (not) to serve Christ

What makes you volunteer to serve at church? When the notices include an appeal for new people on the welcomers’ rota, what makes you stick your hand up? Are you motivated by what  I call the “NAG” way for churches to fill gaps: there is a Need, you are Available, and if you don’t do it, you would feel Guilty?

The trouble with “nag” volunteering is that it misrepresents God (as if He is unable to run His Church and I have to come to the rescue!) and it misrepresents church membership (as if anyone should serve God motivated by guilt). There are much healthier ways to serve God with the personality, passions and gifts I have, and our church has found the “SHAPE” course from Purpose-Driven church really helpful here. But in the first of these three articles about Christian service, prompted in part by reading our book of the term, the excellent “Serving Without Sinking” by John Hindley, I want to ask why serving Christ sometimes goes wrong and  becomes a burden to us instead of a joy.exhaustion2

For anyone who has taken on a serving role and it has become dry or burdensome, it may be good to take a break for a while or find a new ministry for a change. But it may also be good to ask if somewhere I am serving for the wrong motives, arising from a skewed image of God. I recommend John Hindley’s chapters 1-5. Here are three false images of God that make serving Him a burden instead of a delight:

Slot machine God. I may tell myself I know God loves me  as I am but in reality, deep down if I am honest, part of me is serving because I think that by what I do I put God in my debt. If I turn up and give two hours every Sunday to Him, He will give me something in return, like getting chocolate from a machine. He will mend my relationships, or further my career, or answer my prayers more. Of course, this is a false image of God, who showers blessings on us all the time not because we do good things but because He is a good God.

Am I serving God thinking I will get something in return?

Loan-shark God. It is good to recognise how much I am in debt to God for the gift of grace and forgiveness in Christ. It is good to serve in gratitude for what God has done for me. But gratitude can slide into grudging guilt: “God did me a favour, so I owe Him in return. Eternal life comes not as a gift”, I think to myself, “but like a loan which I am paying back every time I do something good.”

Am I serving God thinking that what I do will keep Him loving me?

Damsel-in-distress God. I look around at church and see gaps in the ministry teams: the creche has no helpers, nor does the youth ministry, and the catering team is clearly stressed and undermanned too. “Thank goodness I am here”, I think, “to rescue these people who clearly need my multiple gifts and dedication. I am here to get them, and their God, out of a hole. God needs me to do the things He clearly cannot take care of without me”.

Am I serving because “God needs me” as indispensable to the life of His Church?

All of these three images of God are false ones. God is not a slot machine, a loan-shark or a damsel-in-distress, but a beautiful and bountiful Being1. His service is perfect freedom. Work done for Him is delightful worship. False images dishonour Him and discourage me. They make serving a burden, where it should be “our duty and joy2.

So what is the healthy way to serve God? We start with a more accurate image of who God is as revealed in Jesus, who came not to be served but to serve us by giving his life for us3. That is where we pick up in the next article reflecting on “Serving Without Sinking”.

1   James 1:17 “Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of heavenly lights.”
2  Communion Service Eucharistic Prayer A & C, Common Worship
3 Mark 10:45